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The poster for the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.Episode 24 is our first return to a genre. We're going back to Westerns, but instead of celebrating the traditions of westerns, we're instead celebrating the films that took the Western genre in new and unexpected directions. This week, it's Sergio Leone's neo-realist masterpiece "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" from 1966. Directed by Leone, co-written with Luciano Vincenzoni, and starring Lee Van Cleef, Eli Wallach, and Clint Eastwood, this is a film that delivers storytelling on several different levels simultaneously! Whether it's the beautiful Ennio Morricone score, the incredible cinematography by Tonino Delli Colli, or the performances turned in by these amazing actors, this is a film that, rightfully so, it held as an example of how to make a nigh-unto perfect movie!



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wall eEpisode 23 is a look at two of Pixar's best films (in our humble opinions), and 2008's "Wall-E" is one of their strongest films in practically every single way. Not only is it a stunning visual experience, not only does it possess a score beautiful enough to make a grown man weep, not only is it a tale of innocence and true love, but it's a legitimate science fiction film as well, worthy to be held up with movies like 2001, Blade Runner, Alien, and other sci-fi classics! Directed by Andrew Stanton, and written by Stanton, Pete Docter, and Jim Reardon, this film has the distinction of having the fewest spoken lines of any Pixar film! The lines it does have are voiced by Ben Burtt, Elissa KNight, Jeff Garlin, Fred Willard (in the film's only "actual footage" clips), John Ratzenberger, Kathy Najimy, Sigourney Weaver, and an actual Macintosh voice program called "MacInTalk!" Plus, the trio reveal that they're going back o a genre they've covered already for the next episode, but with a bit of a twist!



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toystoryIn Episode 22, we're looking at the Pixar catalogue and, believe us, figuring out what films to review was our nost contentious argument to date! But, we settled on two that we think capture Pixar at its best. Part 1 is all about the first film from Pixar, the movie that took the world by storm, the original "Toy Story" from 1995! Directed by John Lasseter, and written by LaSseter and a plethora of other writers (including fan-favorite Joss Whedon), this film features the voice-acting of Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Don Rickles, Jim Varney, Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger, Annie Potts, Laurie Metcalf, R. Lee Ermey, and Penn Jilette!



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underdercoverbrotherThe second half our our look at parodies comes full circle with our look at Blaxploitation films in episode 21 with 2002's "Undercover Brother!" Directed by Malcolm D. Lee (cousin to Spike Lee), and written by John Ridley (who wrote the acclaimed "12 Years a Slave"), the film stars Eddie Griffin, Chris Kattan, Denise Richards, Aunjanue Ellis, Dave Chappelle, Chi McBride, Neil Patric Harris, Gary Anthony Williams, and Billy Dee Williams! It's a farce, a romp, that's not afraid to laugh at itself along with the audience, nor poke at some racial stereotypes and beliefs throughout, while, in the end, giving us a really entertaining film! And finally, the trio reveal what two Pixar films they're reviewing for episode 13 as "representative" of the company that has brought us so much feeling and laughter over the last two decades and more!



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austinpowersEpisode 20 is all about parody, specifically films that parody an entire genre, and the suave international spy genre is our first target! Buddy, Chad, and Jeff review 1997's "Austin Powers-International Man of Mystery," directed by Jay Roach, written by and starring Mike Mysers! This film also stars Elizabeth Hurley, Michael York, Mimi Rogers, Robert Wagner, Seth Green, Fabiana Udenio, Mindy Sterling, and Will Ferrell in probably the best send-up of the James Bond films to be made yet!



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